About

When he’s not on the road — and these days, he’s definitely not on the road — Max Gomez splits his time between his beloved hometown of Taos, NM, and Los Angeles. He received critical acclaim upon the release of his 2013 debut album, Rule the World (New West Records), and his subsequent 2017 EP, Me and Joe (Brigadoon Records), which hails the freshly minted classic, “Make It Me,” gaining over two million listeners on Spotify alone.

Today, Gomez is focused on finishing his next album amid a touring hiatus imposed by the worldwide pandemic. But waiting to release one song in particular seemed an impossibility.  A traditional folk song first recorded in the thirties, “He Was a Friend of Mine” has been covered by many legendary artists, including Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, and The Byrds. Gomez’s version features newly written lyrics that comment on historical and contemporary racial and social injustice, with powerful lines like “for not to kill a man, to take the righteous stand, now, I will take a knee.”  

And as a budding performer, Max apprenticed in the rarefied musical micro-climate of northern New Mexico, where troubadours like Michael Martin Murphey and Ray Wylie Hubbard helped foster a Western folk sound both cosmic and cowboy.  Gomez has assumed stewardship of that lineage by producing the Red River Folk Festival, a boutique event held annually in late September in the musical mountain village of Red River, NM.

Judging by the company he keeps, Gomez is positioned to emerge as a prominent voice of Americana’s next generation. He has shared billing on hundreds of stages with stalwarts of the genre like Shawn Mullins, James McMurtry, Buddy Miller, Jim Lauderdale, Patty Griffin, and John Hiatt. His classic-and-contemporary reading of “He Was a Friend of Mine” proves the point.